Lucy Baker was born in 1955 in Wellesley, MA. She is a professional fine artist, who is committed to Abstraction, saying “It is the most fertile approach today. Since the invention of the camera there is no need to paint realistically, although I do both abstraction and realism – realism for the sake of recording events is no longer important. I paint realistically for my own pleasure.”

 

 
Lucy believes too many of today’s artists are over focused in their pursuit of making shock art, and she prefers that art must speak for itself.
 
Since she was a small child, Lucy worked in many styles and mediums. For Lucy, combining styles old and new has worked well for her. From time to time, Lucy has copied many of the great artists of the past, to learn how they made a great artwork, and because of this, her work is a combination of many things, and always changing.
 
 
 
 
Lucy works in a way that combines styles that interest her. This has included combining patterned fluorescent or painted canvas, plastic, or sheet foam, pouring rings of thick, transparent, metallic or a different fluorescent opaque in the centre or in rows or squares, to achieve a pop-art gone wild. In 1978, when she was introduced to her first bucket of gel, she knew this was the paint she was looking for. Any material can be used with and mixed into the acrylic gels, which has led her to extremely three-dimensional work.
 
 
 
Lucy’s work can be seen at The Museum of New, beginning on April 8th until May 13th at the exhibition of the New New Painters.
 
 

 

Lucy Baker was born in 1955 in Wellesley, MA. She is a professional fine artist, who is committed to Abstraction, saying “It is the most fertile approach today. Since the invention of the camera there is no need to paint realistically, although I do both abstraction and realism – realism for the sake of recording events is no longer important. I paint realistically for my own pleasure.”

 

 
Lucy believes too many of today’s artists are over focused in their pursuit of making shock art, and she prefers that art must speak for itself.
 
Since she was a small child, Lucy worked in many styles and mediums. For Lucy, combining styles old and new has worked well for her. From time to time, Lucy has copied many of the great artists of the past, to learn how they made a great artwork, and because of this, her work is a combination of many things, and always changing.
 
 
 
 
Lucy works in a way that combines styles that interest her. This has included combining patterned fluorescent or painted canvas, plastic, or sheet foam, pouring rings of thick, transparent, metallic or a different fluorescent opaque in the centre or in rows or squares, to achieve a pop-art gone wild. In 1978, when she was introduced to her first bucket of gel, she knew this was the paint she was looking for. Any material can be used with and mixed into the acrylic gels, which has led her to extremely three-dimensional work.
 
 
 
Lucy’s work can be seen at The Museum of New, beginning on April 8th until May 13th at the exhibition of the New New Painters.
 
 

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