There were few surprises in the residential resale data that emerged for March sales in the greater Toronto area. The trend continues. Low inventories of available property’s are driving sales and average sale prices, fueled by historically low mortgage interest rates. Rates might even get lower before they start to rise. At the end of March the Bank of Montreal made available a five year mortgage with an interest rate of only at 2.99 percent. Since mortgage interest returns are the banks’ primary source of revenue, increasing competition amongst banks, and no doubt lower rates over the short term, can be anticipated. This is no doubt good news for Sellers who find themselves with multiple bidders for their properties, all hoping to purchase a property before mortgage interest rates begin to rise.

 

In March 8,081 residential properties traded hands, an increase of more than 7 percent compared to 7,537 sales reported in March 2013. The bulk of these sales took place in the 905 region. Of the 8,081 reported sales, 5,103 took place in Halton, Peel, York, Durham, Dufferin and Simcoe County, This is not surprising considering that consumers have more choice in the 905 region, and prices remain lower than comparable properties, if you can find them, in the City of Toronto. Although the gap is declining, the average price for a detached house is $254,000 less in the 905 region –and the buyer pays only one land transfer tax- than in the city of Toronto. Semi-detached homes are $222,000 less expensive.

 

As has been reiterated in many of the last Market Reports, inventories remain a problem. At the end of March there were only 16,543 available properties in the greater Toronto area for buyers to choose, 10 percent fewer than the 18,384 available at the end of March 2013. A positive turn in March was the number of new listings that came to market. This March 14, 829 new properties were listed by realtors in the greater Toronto area. Although only 1.4 percent higher than the 14,618 that came to market in 2013, it represents the first year over year increase that the market has witnessed in a number of months. One month does not create a trend, but it may be that sellers sitting on the metaphorical real estate fence are coming to market in order to capitalize on the surging average resale prices.

 

In March the average resale price came in at $557,684, a record for Toronto, surpassing the previous record for a single month achieved only last month. February’s average sale price came in at $552,885. March’s average sale price was almost 8 percent higher than the average sale price achieved in March 2013. Increases were consistent across all housing types. Detached homes in Toronto increased by 6.8 percent, semi- detached by 8.7 percent, townhouses by 7.7 percent , and condominium apartments by 5.1 percent.

 

Central Toronto remains the most expensive place to live in the greater Toronto area. The average price of a detached home in March exceeded $1,400,000. Semi –detached homes are equally expensive, averaging more than $800,000 for a typical semi. The least expensive area to live in Toronto is now the west end. The average price of properties came in at $587,980, $21,000 less than east end properties. East end properties however remain the hottest real estate commodity in Toronto. All east end properties sold in only 10 days, with most of these sales taking place in Riverdale, Leslieville, and the Beaches. Not only did these properties sell quickly, but on average they sold for 109 percent of their asking price. This is an unprecedented pace for sales. The overall market, including the 905 region saw all properties sold in a startling 21 days, 3 days faster than sales took place in 2013.

 

Condominium apartment sales continue to lag as compared to free-hold sales, although the pace of sales in that market sector is also accelerating. In February condominium apartment sales took 34 days to sell. This pace was consistent with the pace of sales over the last year. In March all condominium apartment sales were achieved in a mere 29 days, the first time that the 30 day barrier has been broken. Given the fact that inventories in this sector are not increasing dramatically, it can be anticipated that over the short term condominiums apartment sales will continue to accelerate. In March 2,941 new condominium apartment listings came to market. Last March 2,850 new listing became available. Heading into April 4325 listings will be available for sale, only 5 more than in April 2013. It is interesting to note that condominium apartment sales now represents 45 percent of all sales that take place in the city of Toronto.

 

Looking forward April should, subject to available inventories, total close to 10,000 property sales. Last April the Toronto Real Estate Bard reported 9,535 sales. There are many buyers attempting to take advantage of five year interest rates that are less than 3 percent, and lenders are eagerly attempting to loan them money. However, with average sales prices beginning to move towards $600,000, an increase in mortgage interest rates maybe the trigger that will slow sales. Since there is no indication of a rate increase, there is no apparent end to the Seller’s market place we have been experiencing since the spring of 2013.

 

 Prepared by: Chris Kapches, President & CEO

 

(Image provided by http://yorkvilleluxuryrealestate.com/)

 There were few surprises in the residential resale data that emerged for March sales in the greater Toronto area. The trend continues. Low inventories of available property’s are driving sales and average sale prices, fueled by historically low mortgage interest rates. Rates might even get lower before they start to rise. At the end of March the Bank of Montreal made available a five year mortgage with an interest rate of only at 2.99 percent. Since mortgage interest returns are the banks’ primary source of revenue, increasing competition amongst banks, and no doubt lower rates over the short term, can be anticipated. This is no doubt good news for Sellers who find themselves with multiple bidders for their properties, all hoping to purchase a property before mortgage interest rates begin to rise.

 

In March 8,081 residential properties traded hands, an increase of more than 7 percent compared to 7,537 sales reported in March 2013. The bulk of these sales took place in the 905 region. Of the 8,081 reported sales, 5,103 took place in Halton, Peel, York, Durham, Dufferin and Simcoe County, This is not surprising considering that consumers have more choice in the 905 region, and prices remain lower than comparable properties, if you can find them, in the City of Toronto. Although the gap is declining, the average price for a detached house is $254,000 less in the 905 region –and the buyer pays only one land transfer tax- than in the city of Toronto. Semi-detached homes are $222,000 less expensive.

 

As has been reiterated in many of the last Market Reports, inventories remain a problem. At the end of March there were only 16,543 available properties in the greater Toronto area for buyers to choose, 10 percent fewer than the 18,384 available at the end of March 2013. A positive turn in March was the number of new listings that came to market. This March 14, 829 new properties were listed by realtors in the greater Toronto area. Although only 1.4 percent higher than the 14,618 that came to market in 2013, it represents the first year over year increase that the market has witnessed in a number of months. One month does not create a trend, but it may be that sellers sitting on the metaphorical real estate fence are coming to market in order to capitalize on the surging average resale prices.

 

In March the average resale price came in at $557,684, a record for Toronto, surpassing the previous record for a single month achieved only last month. February’s average sale price came in at $552,885. March’s average sale price was almost 8 percent higher than the average sale price achieved in March 2013. Increases were consistent across all housing types. Detached homes in Toronto increased by 6.8 percent, semi- detached by 8.7 percent, townhouses by 7.7 percent , and condominium apartments by 5.1 percent.

 

Central Toronto remains the most expensive place to live in the greater Toronto area. The average price of a detached home in March exceeded $1,400,000. Semi –detached homes are equally expensive, averaging more than $800,000 for a typical semi. The least expensive area to live in Toronto is now the west end. The average price of properties came in at $587,980, $21,000 less than east end properties. East end properties however remain the hottest real estate commodity in Toronto. All east end properties sold in only 10 days, with most of these sales taking place in Riverdale, Leslieville, and the Beaches. Not only did these properties sell quickly, but on average they sold for 109 percent of their asking price. This is an unprecedented pace for sales. The overall market, including the 905 region saw all properties sold in a startling 21 days, 3 days faster than sales took place in 2013.

 

Condominium apartment sales continue to lag as compared to free-hold sales, although the pace of sales in that market sector is also accelerating. In February condominium apartment sales took 34 days to sell. This pace was consistent with the pace of sales over the last year. In March all condominium apartment sales were achieved in a mere 29 days, the first time that the 30 day barrier has been broken. Given the fact that inventories in this sector are not increasing dramatically, it can be anticipated that over the short term condominiums apartment sales will continue to accelerate. In March 2,941 new condominium apartment listings came to market. Last March 2,850 new listing became available. Heading into April 4325 listings will be available for sale, only 5 more than in April 2013. It is interesting to note that condominium apartment sales now represents 45 percent of all sales that take place in the city of Toronto.

 

Looking forward April should, subject to available inventories, total close to 10,000 property sales. Last April the Toronto Real Estate Bard reported 9,535 sales. There are many buyers attempting to take advantage of five year interest rates that are less than 3 percent, and lenders are eagerly attempting to loan them money. However, with average sales prices beginning to move towards $600,000, an increase in mortgage interest rates maybe the trigger that will slow sales. Since there is no indication of a rate increase, there is no apparent end to the Seller’s market place we have been experiencing since the spring of 2013.

 

 Prepared by: Chris Kapches, President & CEO

 

(Image provided by http://yorkvilleluxuryrealestate.com/)

 There were few surprises in the residential resale data that emerged for March sales in the greater Toronto area. The trend continues. Low inventories of available property’s are driving sales and average sale prices, fueled by historically low mortgage interest rates. Rates might even get lower before they start to rise. At the end of March the Bank of Montreal made available a five year mortgage with an interest rate of only at 2.99 percent. Since mortgage interest returns are the banks’ primary source of revenue, increasing competition amongst banks, and no doubt lower rates over the short term, can be anticipated. This is no doubt good news for Sellers who find themselves with multiple bidders for their properties, all hoping to purchase a property before mortgage interest rates begin to rise.

 

In March 8,081 residential properties traded hands, an increase of more than 7 percent compared to 7,537 sales reported in March 2013. The bulk of these sales took place in the 905 region. Of the 8,081 reported sales, 5,103 took place in Halton, Peel, York, Durham, Dufferin and Simcoe County, This is not surprising considering that consumers have more choice in the 905 region, and prices remain lower than comparable properties, if you can find them, in the City of Toronto. Although the gap is declining, the average price for a detached house is $254,000 less in the 905 region –and the buyer pays only one land transfer tax- than in the city of Toronto. Semi-detached homes are $222,000 less expensive.

 

As has been reiterated in many of the last Market Reports, inventories remain a problem. At the end of March there were only 16,543 available properties in the greater Toronto area for buyers to choose, 10 percent fewer than the 18,384 available at the end of March 2013. A positive turn in March was the number of new listings that came to market. This March 14, 829 new properties were listed by realtors in the greater Toronto area. Although only 1.4 percent higher than the 14,618 that came to market in 2013, it represents the first year over year increase that the market has witnessed in a number of months. One month does not create a trend, but it may be that sellers sitting on the metaphorical real estate fence are coming to market in order to capitalize on the surging average resale prices.

 

In March the average resale price came in at $557,684, a record for Toronto, surpassing the previous record for a single month achieved only last month. February’s average sale price came in at $552,885. March’s average sale price was almost 8 percent higher than the average sale price achieved in March 2013. Increases were consistent across all housing types. Detached homes in Toronto increased by 6.8 percent, semi- detached by 8.7 percent, townhouses by 7.7 percent , and condominium apartments by 5.1 percent.

 

Central Toronto remains the most expensive place to live in the greater Toronto area. The average price of a detached home in March exceeded $1,400,000. Semi –detached homes are equally expensive, averaging more than $800,000 for a typical semi. The least expensive area to live in Toronto is now the west end. The average price of properties came in at $587,980, $21,000 less than east end properties. East end properties however remain the hottest real estate commodity in Toronto. All east end properties sold in only 10 days, with most of these sales taking place in Riverdale, Leslieville, and the Beaches. Not only did these properties sell quickly, but on average they sold for 109 percent of their asking price. This is an unprecedented pace for sales. The overall market, including the 905 region saw all properties sold in a startling 21 days, 3 days faster than sales took place in 2013.

 

Condominium apartment sales continue to lag as compared to free-hold sales, although the pace of sales in that market sector is also accelerating. In February condominium apartment sales took 34 days to sell. This pace was consistent with the pace of sales over the last year. In March all condominium apartment sales were achieved in a mere 29 days, the first time that the 30 day barrier has been broken. Given the fact that inventories in this sector are not increasing dramatically, it can be anticipated that over the short term condominiums apartment sales will continue to accelerate. In March 2,941 new condominium apartment listings came to market. Last March 2,850 new listing became available. Heading into April 4325 listings will be available for sale, only 5 more than in April 2013. It is interesting to note that condominium apartment sales now represents 45 percent of all sales that take place in the city of Toronto.

 

Looking forward April should, subject to available inventories, total close to 10,000 property sales. Last April the Toronto Real Estate Bard reported 9,535 sales. There are many buyers attempting to take advantage of five year interest rates that are less than 3 percent, and lenders are eagerly attempting to loan them money. However, with average sales prices beginning to move towards $600,000, an increase in mortgage interest rates maybe the trigger that will slow sales. Since there is no indication of a rate increase, there is no apparent end to the Seller’s market place we have been experiencing since the spring of 2013.

 

 Prepared by: Chris Kapches, President & CEO

 

(Image provided by http://yorkvilleluxuryrealestate.com/)

Older Blog Posts